Academic Standards and Regulations

I. Good Academic Standing

Students in good academic standing are those students eligible to continue the study of law and who are not on academic probation.

II. Residence Requirement

A student must complete at least two-thirds (2/3) of the course work required for the Juris Doctor degree at Campbell Law School to receive a degree from Campbell Law School. All degree requirements must be satisfied withn 84 months from the commencement of study.

III. Attendance Policy

ABA Standard 308 requires the law school to “adopt, publish, and adhere to sound academic standards, including those for regular class attendance …”

The law school believes that regular class attendance (i) is an essential component of academic success and (ii) fosters the development of punctuality, dependability, commitment, and other sound professional character traits.

Students must adhere to the attendance policy published by the professor.

IV. Graduation Requirements

The curriculum that follows is required of all law students. All students must complete a total of 90 hours for graduation and have earned a final cumulative average of at least 75.

First year required curriculum:

FALL SEMESTER

 

SPRING SEMESTER

 

Course

Credit Hrs.

Course

Credit Hrs.

Civil Procedure I

2

Civil Procedure II

2

Contracts I

3

Contracts II

2

Legal Research/Writing I

2

Legal Research/Writing II

3

Criminal Law

3

Constitutional Law I

3

Property I

2

Property II

3

Torts I

3

Torts II

2

 

Upper level required curriculum:

 

Course

   Credit Hours

Advanced Legal Writing*

3

Business Organizations

3

Constitutional Law II

3

Criminal Procedure

3

Evidence

3

Professional Responsibility and Ethics

2 or 3

Sales and Leases

3

Secured Transactions

3

Trial Advocacy

4

Wills and Trusts

3

Jurisprudence Course Requirement**

typically 2

Planning Course Requirement

typically 2

Electives**

approximately 25

* For students who began their legal education in Fall 2016, this is a required course that does not satisfy the RWE requirement.  

**Depending on the professor, can be taken to satisfy the RWE requirement

 

In addition, each student must complete a “rigorous writing experience” or “RWE” prior to graduation. The RWE is not a separate course requirement. It is a process that can be incorporated into an existing course or satisfied through other means, such as an independent study. The RWE guidelines are available infra Section X.

Second year students must take the following six required courses during their second year:

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Either Semester

Con. Law II

Bus. Organizations

Advanced Legal Writing

Wills and Trusts

Crim. Procedure

Evidence

 

All other required courses can be taken in any semester after the first year.

To be enrolled as a full-time student, a student must register for at least ten credits and no more than 17 credits.  Credits to be earned during a semester for the following are included in calculating compliance:  externships, independent studies, law review service, advocacy competitions (e.g., moot court, mock trial, and Old Kivett), and any dual degree credits to be earned during that same semester, provided that the credits are from courses the law school has previously agreed to count against its 90-credits graduation requirement.

Candidates who are lacking no more than 3 credit hours of meeting all requirements may file a “Request to Participate in Commencement” form in addition to an “Application for Graduation.”  Forms for these purposes are available in the law school’s Registrar’s Office.  If approved, the candidate will be allowed to participate in only one Commencement program for the degree in question. Furthermore, if the candidate is approved for participation in a May Commencement, the candidate will not be eligible to participate in any subsequent semester when the candidate would have been eligible after having met all graduation requirements. Candidates participating in May graduation exercises under the “three-hour rule” will not be ranked with students graduating at that time, but instead will be ranked with all other students who graduate thereafter through the following May (if all graduation requirements have been met).

V. Independent Study

Campbell Law School students may obtain credit for work completed for independent study under the supervision of a member of the Campbell Law faculty. To be eligible for independent study, a student must have a faculty sponsor who, together with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, must approve the student’s proposal prior to the beginning of the independent study and no later than the last day to add a course for the relevant semester. An independent study form is available in the Registrar’s suite.

Students may receive a maximum of three credit hours of independent study over the course of their study at Campbell Law School. Students and faculty sponsors shall address in the proposal whether any credit hours will be reflected on the transcript with either a numerical grade or the “pass/fail” designation. A student may receive a numerical grade for no more than two credits of independent study, unless the third credit is for an independent study that qualifies as the student’s initial rigorous writing experience.

VI. Grading Information

Campbell Law School has a numerical grading system for most courses and a descriptive grading system for some courses.

A. Numerical Grading System

93 to 100: Demonstrates a superior level of competence.
84 to 92: Demonstrates an above average level of competence.
75 to 83: Demonstrates the level of competence expected within the profession.
65 to 74: Demonstrates an unsatisfactory level of performance but sufficient potential to provide a foundation for competence.
55 to 64: Requires repetition of the course for receipt of academic credit.

The numerical grades described above do not represent percentages of correct answers to examination questions; rather, they are designed to allow professors to reflect differences of achievement within levels of competence. Unless otherwise announced by a professor, a written examination will be given at the end of each course.

B. Descriptive Grading System

Honors: Demonstrates a superior level of competence and distinctively superior level of achievement.

Satisfactory: Demonstrates a good to an above-average level of competence.

Unsatisfactory/Passing: Demonstrates an unsatisfactory level of performance in the course, but demonstrates sufficient potential to provide a foundation for competence. Academic credit is awarded for the course.

Unsatisfactory/Failing: Demonstrates an unsatisfactory level of performance in the course and requires repetition of the course for receipt of academic credit.

The above-listed descriptive grades will be posted on each student’s transcript. They are not used for the calculation of semester or cumulative grade point averages; rather, grade point average and class rank are based solely on the cumulative average of numerically graded courses.

The grade of “Honors” will be earned only when, in the professional opinion of the faculty member, a student’s performance has met the standard set forth above. It is therefore possible for there to be no “Honors” grades in some courses in some years. In no event shall an “Honors” grade be given to any student who does not rank in the top 1/3 of students taking the course. This rule is intended to preserve the integrity and meaningfulness of the “Honors” designation.

Students may elect to take a maximum of two numerically-graded classes for a descriptive grade rather than for a numerical grade.  To exercise this option, the student must receive timely approval from the professor teaching the course and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, using the form available in the Registrar’s suite. The student must get approval no later than the last day to add a course for the relevant semester.

C. Grading Policy and Mandatory Medians

The median grade range for required courses is 81-83. The median grade range for elective courses is 83-85.

If a class has an enrollment of 12 or fewer students, a faculty member may deviate from the median range. If a class has an enrollment of more than 12 students, a faculty member may deviate from the median range with written justification and the explicit approval of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

A professor is not bound by the foregoing mandated median ranges in a course in which a final exam (including, without limitation, a take-home exam) is not administered. The preceding sentence is not applicable to any first-year course.

VII. Academic Standards

1. Academic Probation

Any student, who has not been excluded pursuant to the Academic Exclusion provision set forth below, whose semester average is below 75 will be placed on academic probation for the next semester. During this probationary period, the student will be subject to the supervision of the Associate Dean, is required to work with the law school’s Director of Academic Support, and may not participate in any externships, or hold any office or leadership position in any law school student organization. Any participation in moot court or mock trial competitions, law review membership, SBA activities, Admissions Office receptions and activities, and sports activities organized in whole or in part by the law school must be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Any student whose grades require probation or exclusion shall be placed in such a status as of the first day of the semester following the semester for which the unsatisfactory grades were earned, regardless of when the grades were actually reported.

Grades earned in summer school shall be taken into account in the fall semester following the summer school session in which the course was completed.

2. Academic Exclusion

Any student will be excluded from further study in the School of Law if:

  1. The student has received two grades below 65 in the first semester in the School of Law;
  2. The student’s grade point average for the first semester in the School of Law is below 70.0;
  3. The student’s cumulative average is below 73.5 at any time after the completion of two (2) semesters in the School of Law;
  4. The student’s cumulative required1 course average is below 74.25 after the completion of (3) semesters in the School of Law;
  5. The student’s cumulative required course average is below 75 at any time after the completion of four (4) semesters in the School of Law;
  6. The student’s overall cumulative average is below 75 at any time after the completion of four (4) semesters in the School of Law;
  7. The student has received three or more grades below 65 (a grade of UF is considered below 65 for purposes of this rule).

3. Appeals from Academic Exclusion from the Study of Law

  1. Except as provided in paragraph B. immediately following, there is no right to appeal an exclusion from further study in the School of  Law.2

  2. Anyone excluded after earning more than seventy (70) hours of academic credit in the School of Law shall have the right to appeal once to the faculty Academic Appeals Committee for a waiver of the exclusion rule(s) applicable to that person’s exclusion. Appeals shall be governed by the rules set forth in paragraph C. immediately following.
  3. Anyone permitted to petition the faculty Academic Appeals Committee for a waiver of the exclusion rule under paragraph B. immediately above must present a written petition requesting a waiver of the exclusion rules. The petition must delivered to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at least 72 hours before the scheduled meeting of the Committee. It is presumed that the Petitioner’s unsatisfactory academic performance in the School of Law’s academic program is the best indication of how the Petitioner would perform in the future. The Petitioner has the burden of overcoming this presumption by clear and convincing evidence. This clear and convincing evidence shall include evidence as to why the Petitioner’s future studies will be successful. The petition for a waiver of the exclusion rule shall be denied unless the burden of proof is clearly met. While there is no right to appear in person before the Committee, a student may file a request to appear with reasons therefore stated in the petition. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

4. Flex Time Program Academic Exclusion Rules

A student enrolled in the Flex Time Program is subject to the same rules set forth above under the heading of “Academic Exclusion” except that a “semester” (as reference above) for a student enrolled in the Flex Time Program is the completion of two semesters in the Flex Time Program.

5. Reapplication Rules for Students Academically Excluded from Further Study in the School of Law

A student excluded at the end of that student’s first year of law school may petition only one time for a waiver of the exclusion rule. If the petition is denied by the Committee, the Petitioner may apply for admission as a first year law student through the normal application process established by the School of Law’s Office of Admissions.

6. Repetition of Courses and Re-Examination

A grade below 65 is a failing grade and requires repetition of the course for receipt of academic credit. Re-examinations are not offered or permitted.

The faculty may decide that a student with a grade of 65 to 74 in a course needs to repeat that course or take a specified elective or group of electives to ensure a sufficient foundation for competence. A student with a pattern of grades in the 65 to 74 range may be required at the discretion of the faculty to repeat an entire semester or academic year in order to ensure competence in core courses. In the event the faculty decides that repetition of courses is necessary, the student will be notified in advance and will be entitled to be heard before the Academic Appeals Committee on the matter. To the extent courses are repeated, both grades will be included in the calculation of the student’s cumulative average.

____________________________________

1. This provision refers to the student’s grade point average only for the semester in question. This semester average is independent of the student’s cumulative grade point average which is addressed in Academic Exclusion point 3) above. Illustrations of the application of this provision follow:

  • A has a 77.2 cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the end of the first year of law school. A’s GPA for the Fall Semester of A’s second year of law school is 74.8 which produces a cumulative GPA of 76.43. Because A’s GPA for the Fall Semester of A’s second year of law school was less than 75.00, A is placed on academic probation. A then earns a 74.7 GPA for the Spring Semester of A’s second year of law school which produces a cumulative GPA of 76.01. A is automatically excluded under this provision because A was on probation when A earned a semester GPA of less than 75.00 in the Spring Semester of A’s second year.
  • B earns a semester grade point average (GPA) of 74.2 in the Spring Semester of B’s first year of law school which produces a cumulative GPA of 79.00 for B’s first year of law school. B is placed on academic probation because B’s GPA for the Spring Semester of B’s first year of law school was below 75.00. In the Fall Semester of B’s second year of law school, B earns a GPA of 74.6 which produces a cumulative GPA of 77.59. B is excluded under this provision because B was on probation when B earned a semester GPA of less than 75.00 in the Fall Semester of B’s second year.

7. Academic Appeals (all other academic matters)3

Academic appeals are handled within Campbell Law School. Any grievance of a student relating to an academic matter shall first be discussed with the appropriate faculty member. Every effort should be made to resolve the matter at this level. If the grievance cannot be resolved with the faculty member, the student shall discuss the matter with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. If the grievance cannot be resolved with the Associate Dean, the student shall discuss the matter with the Dean. The decision of the Dean in such academic matters is final.

____________________________________

3. This paragraph does not apply to academic exclusions.

VII. Flex Time Program

A. OBJECTIVE

The objective of the Flex Time program is to enable entering law students to earn a Juris Doctor degree by taking fewer hours each semester than required by the full-time program. The program is most ideally suited for students who have some degree of flexibility in the scheduling of their outside obligations.

B. ADMISSION

  1. The admissions standards applicable to students applying to study under the Flex Time program shall be the same as the admissions standards applicable to students applying for full time study.
  2. A student who chooses to enroll in the Flex Time program shall communicate that choice to the Admissions Committee in a manner to be determined by the Assistant Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid.
  3. The Flex Time program of study is available to applicants who have not previously enrolled as full-time students at Campbell Law School or at any other law school, absent consent of the Dean.

C. CURRICULUM

During the first two years of study, students enrolled in the Flex Time program shall complete the courses listed in subsection C.1. and C.2. below. It is highly recommended that students complete the courses in the order provided. However, upon approval by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a student may alter the recommended schedule provided that sequential courses are taken in consecutive semesters. By way of example, a student may opt, with approval, to take Property I rather than Civil Procedure I in the fall semester of the first year. The student must then take Property II in the spring semester of the first year. The same requirement for taking sequential courses in consecutive semesters applies to Civil Procedure I and II, Contracts I and II and Torts I and II. However, both Legal Research and Writing courses must be taken during the first year, and (unless (i) previously taken as a summer course or (ii) deferred for the reason stated in Section C.1. below) Criminal Law must be taken during the first semester of the second year and Constitutional Law I must be taken during the second semester of the second year.

The curriculum subsequent to the first two years of study is addressed at subsection 3 below.

1. FIRST-YEAR CURRICULUM

FALL SEMESTER

 

SPRING SEMESTER

 

Course

Credit Hrs.

Course

Credit Hrs.

Civil Procedure I

2

Civil Procedure II

2

Contracts I

3

Contracts II

2

Legal Research/Writing I

 

2

Legal Research/Writing II

3

 

A student who receives a grade lower than 65 in Civil Procedure I, Contracts I, or Legal Research and Writing I (i) must retake that course during the student’s second Fall semester and (ii) may not take Criminal Law during the student’s second Fall semester. Instead, the student must take Criminal Law during the student’s third Fall semester (unless the student has taken Criminal Law during a previous summer term).

A student who receives a grade lower than 65 in Civil Procedure II, Contracts II, or Legal Research and Writing II (i) must retake that course during the student’s second Spring semester and (ii) may not take Constitutional Law I during the student’s second Spring semester. Instead, the student must take Constitutional Law I during the student’s third Spring semester (unless the student has taken Constitutional Law I during a previous summer term).

2. SECOND-YEAR CURRICULUM

FALL SEMESTER

 

SPRING SEMESTER

 

Course

Credit Hrs.

Course

Credit Hrs.

Criminal Law

3

Constitutional Law I

3

Property I

2

Property II

3

Torts I

 

3

Torts II

2

3. SUBSEQUENT CURRICULUM

Upon the completion of the first two years of study, students enrolled in the Flex Time program must complete the same course work required of full-time students. While it is recommended that Flex Time students complete their studies by the end of the spring semester of the fifth year of study, students may extend their studies beyond the fifth year in order to complete the requirements for the Juris Doctor degree. However, a Flex Time student must complete all degree requirements within 84 months of the commencement of study.

Students must take at least five credit hours in each fall and spring semester and may take no more than nine credit hours in each fall and spring semester to maintain Flex Time status. A student may at any time, subsequent to the first two years of study, elect to become a full-time student by enrolling in more than nine credit hours of study in a single semester. Such a student will be subject to the academic regulations and standards applicable to full time students and will be assessed full time tuition. A Flex Time student who chooses to become a full-time student in a given semester may again return to Flex Time status in any subsequent semester by taking nine or fewer credit hours in that semester.

The graduation requirements for all students are stated supra Section IV.

Courses in the Flex Time program are subject to the same prerequisites applicable to the full-time program. Course prerequisites and a description of courses are available at the law school’s intranet website under the Academic Affairs tab.

4. TUITION

During the first two years of study, a student enrolled in the Flex Time program shall pay one-half the tuition assessed full time students. Thereafter, a student taking nine or fewer credit hours in a single semester shall pay a prorated “per hour” tuition. If a student enrolled in the Flex Time program becomes a full-time student by taking more than nine hours in a fall or spring semester, the student will be assessed full time tuition.

5. SUMMER SESSION

  1. Most, if not all, courses offered during summer sessions are upper level required and elective courses. Since the first two years of Flex Time study are intended to provide students with the proper foundation for upper level courses, students enrolled in the Flex Time program are not eligible to attend the summer session between their first and second years of study (with the exception of taking Criminal Law or Constitutional Law I, if either or both are offered as summer courses). Upon completion of the first two years of study, students enrolled in the Flex Time program may attend summer sessions.
  2. The minimum credit hours (five) and maximum credit hours (nine) applicable to the Flex Time program do not apply to summer session. Subject to law school restrictions, students enrolled in summer session may take as few or as many hours as convenient to complete their studies. Summer session tuition for Flex Time students will be assessed on the same per-hour basis as applicable to full time students.

6. GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND CLASS RANK

The semester and cumulative grade point averages for Flex Time students shall be calculated at the end of each semester in the same manner applicable to full time students.

Flex Time students will be ranked upon the completion of thirty, sixty and ninety hours of study, and will be ranked with the “then current” first year, second year and third year classes respectively. At interim periods, the law school Registrar may provide a Flex Time student with his or her class rank stated as consistent with a ranking in the top 5%, 10%, 25%, 33%, or 50% of the comparative class of full time students at such time.

7. STUDENT ACTIVITIES

Upon the completion of the first two years of study (or, if earlier, as otherwise provided in the bylaws of the Campbell Law Review), Flex Time students will be eligible to participate in all student activities, organizations, offices and competitions to the same extent as full time students.

8. EMPLOYMENT

Students enrolled in the Flex Time program and taking nine or fewer credit hours in any given semester may engage in outside employment as they deem necessary and prudent. However, any Flex Time student who elects to become a full time student by enrolling in more than nine credit hours in a given semester, other than summer session, shall be limited to twenty hours per week of outside employment.

9. SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID

Flex Time students are eligible for scholarships, on a pro rata basis, to the same extent and under the same conditions applicable to full time students.

Subject to applicable financial aid regulations, Flex Time students may be eligible for financial aid.

10. ACADEMIC STANDARDS – FLEX TIME STUDENTS

Current Flex Time students who started in or after August 2015 are subject to the academic standards stated supra section VII.

11. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS – FLEX TIME STUDENTS

A. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Degree Awarded: The degree awarded by the School of Law is the Juris Doctor (JD) degree.
  2. Course Requirements: The School of Law requires the successful completion of 90 credit hours of work for awarding of the JD degree.

B. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS

To earn the Juris Doctor degree, it is highly recommended that a Flex Time student complete the required 90 credit hours of course work by the spring semester of the fifth year of study. However, if necessary to complete the work required for the Juris Doctor degree, Flex Time students may extend their time of study provided that all degree requirements are satisfied within 84 months from the commencement of study. It is recommended that Flex Time students extend their studies beyond the spring semester of the fifth year only after consultation with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

C. MINIMUM CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE

Candidates for the Juris Doctor degree must have earned a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 75 at the time of graduation. 

D. GOOD STANDING

Students in good standing are those students eligible to continue the study of law and who are not on academic probation.

E. GRADING SYSTEM

The grading system described supra Section VI applies to all Flex Time students.

IX. Distance Education Policy

A student may earn no more than six credits in distance education (“online”) courses, whether or not taught by a full-time Campbell Law professor. Courses must be pre-approved by the Curriculum Committee and cannot be a course required by the law school.

All eligible distance education credits will be posted to the student’s law school transcript bearing a descriptive grade of “S” (for “Satisfactory”) and will have no impact on the student’s semester or cumulative grade point average. If the credits are graded numerically, or if a letter grade is assigned to the credits, then a student must earn at least a 75 (or at least a straight “C”) for the credits to be posted to the student’s law school transcript. If the credits are graded descriptively, a student must earn at least an “S” (for “Satisfactory”) or its equivalent for the credits to be posted to the student’s law school transcript. A distance education course taught by a full-time Campbell law professor is not subject to the grading rules of this paragraph.

Unless the student timely elects to take a distance education course for a descriptive grade (when a numerical or letter grade is expected to be awarded by the professor), the course itself does not impact the student’s ability to elect to take two eligible, non-distance education, courses for a descriptive grade.

X. Rigorous Writing Experience (RWE) Guidelines[1]

Pursuant to ABA Standard 303(a)(2), all Campbell law students are required to complete one rigorous writing experience (RWE) during their second or third year of study.[2]

The RWE is intended to engage the student in the process of writing and therefore requires completion of one or more properly attributed written work products, individually or collectively of substantial length[3], which entail significant and thorough independent research. The written work product may be traditional scholarly writing or practice-related documents.

Different faculty may have different expectations for supervising an RWE. At a minimum, however, an RWE requires:

(a) The student to submit for faculty review and comment at least one preliminary draft of written work product of significant length;

(b) The professor to provide detailed written and oral feedback on the draft to the student in an individual conference; and

(c) The student to incorporate written and oral feedback from the professor into subsequent versions of the written work product.

At the conclusion of the semester, the professor supervising an RWE will certify on the Rigorous Writing Experience Form[4] that the student’s written work product satisfies the RWE guidelines. Within thirty days after the professor’s execution date, the student shall submit the Rigorous Writing Experience Form and a physical or digital copy of the final paper or papers to the Registrar’s Office for placement into that student’s file. The law school shall maintain a copy of the final work product, certified as an RWE, for two years from the date of certification.

Any full-time faculty member may designate his or her elective course[5] (or independent study[6]) as an RWE. Any adjunct faculty member may designate his or her elective course as an RWE only after obtaining permission of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (such permission to be obtained prior to the end of the drop-add period of the relevant semester or term).

A professor may offer RWE credit to no more than 15 students in a course, even if more than 15 students are enrolled in the course. Students not receiving RWE credit may take a final exam, write a paper for non-RWE credit, or otherwise perform as directed by the professor. A professor is not bound to adhere to any institutional grading curve or policy when awarding RWE credit. The number of students taking a course for RWE credit shall be subtracted from the total number of students enrolled in the course to determine the applicability of any institutional grading curve or policy to the students not earning RWE credit.

A student on the Campbell Law Review may write his or her “comment” as an RWE if the writing process is overseen from the beginning by a full-time faculty member and all requirements of these guidelines are met. A student cannot receive RWE credit for a comment unless the student has consulted with a full-time faculty member on topic selection, research, outlining, and drafting the comment.

XI. Transfer students

A student from another ABA-approved law school may be admitted to advanced standing as a candidate for a Campbell Law degree. A transfer student must complete two-thirds (2/3) of the course work required for the Juris Doctor degree at Campbell Law school. Credit for work done at other law schools is given at the discretion of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and must have been completed with at least a grade of “C” or its equivalent.

Students seeking to transfer must have completed most of the following first-year classes before they will be allowed to transfer: Civil Procedure, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, Torts, and Legal Research and Writing.

In addition to the Campbell Law application, transfer students are required to provide a $50 application fee, a Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report, a letter of good standing from your current law school, your most recent transcript showing completion of the required first-year courses, and law school class rank. Applications should be timely submitted to the Director of Admissions.

Tuition is by semester, NOT by credit hour. A minimum of 10 credit hours per semester is required, even by transfer and visiting students. The Campbell FLEX program is only available to entering 1L students who intend to complete their entire JD program at Campbell Law.

XII. Visiting students

With the approval of the Admissions Committee, it is possible for students from other law schools to matriculate at Campbell Law for up to one year as visiting students. Visiting students must have the permission of their home law school and be in good academic standing. They will receive their law degrees from their home law school and will not be eligible for a Campbell Law School degree.

Visiting applicants must complete an application to Campbell Law School. In addition, a $50 application fee is required along with a Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report, a letter of good standing from the visitor’s current law school, a law school transcript, and law school class rank. Applications should be timely submitted to the Director of Admissions.

Tuition is by semester, NOT by credit hour. A minimum of 10 credit hours per semester is required, even by transfer and visiting students. The Campbell FLEX program is only available to entering 1L students who intend to complete their entire JD program at Campbell Law.

XIII. Transfer of Law Credits

Campbell law students may transfer law credits earned elsewhere, for example in summer programs.  The credits must be awarded by another ABA-accredited law school. Students should contact either the Registrar or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for any letter of “good standing” requested by the host law school.

A student cannot receive credit towards his or her Campbell JD degree for a course involving significant overlap with a course already taken (or to be taken) for credit at Campbell Law School.

No more than six aggregate credits from the other law school(s) will transfer to a student’s Campbell JD transcript.

Courses taken at another law school do not satisfy any specific Campbell JD requirements (e.g., particular course requirements, or planning/jurisprudence/RWE/track requirements), other than counting toward Campbell Law School’s 90-credit graduation requirement to earn the JD degree.

A student must obtain pre-approval from Campbell Law School’s externship director if any of the course credits are in the nature of externship coursework.

Grades for eligible credits are posted to the Campbell JD transcript as descriptive (sometimes referred to as “pass/fail”), rather than numerical. A student must earn the equivalent of at least a straight “C” (not a C- or lower) in the course to receive credit posted to the Campbell JD transcript. The host law school must provide a written statement to this effect, before Campbell will post any transfer credits to the JD transcript. A student is responsible for timely obtaining an official transcript from the host school and then timely delivering it to the Registrar for the posting of course credits to the student’s Campbell JD transcript.

A student should direct inquiries concerning financial aid to the law school’s financial aid officer.

A. Transfer of credits earned by a student in a dual degree program.

Campbell Law School has agreed to count against its 90-credits graduation requirement the following credits from its dual degree programs. The student must earn a 3.0 (or “B” equivalent) in the course in order for the credits to transfer to the JD transcript. A student is responsible for timely obtaining an official transcript from the host institution and then timely delivering it to the Registrar for the posting of course credits to the student’s Campbell JD transcript.

  • Campbell MBA: Maximum of six credits, from the following:
    • BADM 710 Accounting for Decision Making
    • BADM 720 Applied Economics for Business Leaders
    • BADM 730 Finance and Capital Management
    • BADM 732 Management of Financial Institutions
    • BADM 750 Organizational Culture in a Changing Environment
    • BADM 790 Strategic Management “Live Case” Seminar
  • Campbell MSPH:
    • Statistical Methods I
    • Health Policy and Management
  • Campbell MDiv: Maximum of nine credits, from the following:
    • Theology and Culture
    • Introduction to Urban and Social Ministry
    • Any two of the following:
      • Christian Ethics
      • Special Topics in Ethics – Virtues and Vices
      • Ethics, Spirituality, and Religion in the Helping Professions
    • Any two of the following:
      • Counseling and Christian Ministry
      • Counseling Theories and Techniques
      • Marriage and Family Counseling
      • Advanced Theology elective (subject to prior written approval of law school’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs)
      • Directed Readings (subject to prior written approval of law school’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs)
    • Campbell MTWM: Maximum of six credits, from the following:
      • TRST 620 Financial Planning Seminar
      • TRST 630 Investment Analysis
      • TRST 631 Advanced Investment Analysis
      • TRST 750 Advanced Retirement Planning
      • TRST 780 Legal/Regulatory Issues
    • North Carolina State Univ. MBA: Maximum of nine credits (no specific courses)
    • North Carolina State Univ. MPA: Maximum of nine credits (no specific courses)
    • North Carolina State Univ. MAcc: Maximum of six credits (no specific courses)

B. Transfer of credits earned by a Campbell law student who is a “visiting” student at another ABA-accredited law school.

A Campbell law student who seeks to be a “visiting” student at another ABA-accredited law school for an academic semester (or academic year) must timely inform the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of this desire well in advance of the desired visit. Decisions regarding which courses the student must (or may) take at the host law school, and the conditions under which credits for those courses will transfer to the Campbell JD transcript, are made on a case-by-case basis.

XIV. Employment During Law School

Campbell Law full-time students are not permitted to work during the first year of school. Students are permitted to work during winter break and summer breaks. During the second and third years of law school, ABA standards dictate that students enrolled full-time may not work more than 20 hours per week.

There are no employment restrictions placed on students enrolled in the Campbell FLEX program.

XV. Disability Policy

Please refer to the policy at this link: ____________________________.

 

XVI. Auditing a Course

Campbell Law School allows any member of the Bar to audit a course at the law school, with the permission of the professor, for a flat fee of $1,000. Anyone wishing to audit a course should contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

 

XVII. Procedures for Student Complaints concerning Campbell Law School’s Program of Legal Education

A. Suggestions

The Law School welcomes suggestions from students. Written and signed suggestions may be submitted to the Dean, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, or the Director of Student Life and Pro Bono Opportunities. Students can also submit suggestions through the digital “suggestion box” on the law school intranet.

Suggestions, whether signed or anonymous, can also be communicated to the president of the Student Bar association, who will convey those suggestions to the Dean.

The appropriate law school administrator will respond in writing to law students submitting signed suggestions. The response will indicate what action, if any, will be taken by the Law School. Where the suggestion has been communicated to the Dean by the SBA president, the Dean will respond either orally or in writing to the SBA president.

B. Formal Complaints

As an ABA-accredited law school, Campbell Law School is subject to the ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools.[7]

Any Campbell Law student who wishes to bring to the attention of Campbell Law School a significant problem that directly implicates its program of legal of education and its compliance with the ABA Standards should take the following steps:

  1. The student shall file a complaint with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The complaint must (a) be in writing, (b) identify the problem and the particular ABA Standard(s) implicated, in sufficient detail to permit an investigation of the matter, and (c) be signed and dated by the student, and include the student’s official law school email address, telephone number, and current mailing address.
  2. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (or his or her designee) will acknowledge receipt of the written complaint within five business days after receiving the complaint. This acknowledgment may be in written or electronic form
  3. Within thirty business days after receiving the complaint, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (or his or her designee) will investigate the matter identified by the complaint and will respond to the student, in written or electronic form, indicating what steps, if any, are being (or will be) taken by Campbell Law School to address the matter.
  4. 4. The student may timely appeal this response to the Dean of the Law School. An appeal must include the original complaint, the response of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and an explanation of why the Associate Dean’s response is in error. The appeal is timely if it is received by the Dean no later than the tenth business day following the date on which the Associate Dean responded to the complaint. Within ten business days following the date on which the Dean receives the appeal, the Dean will respond to the student in written or electronic form. The Dean’s decision is final.
  5. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will maintain a copy of the complaint, together with a summary of the process and its resolution, in his or her office for a period of eight years from the date of the Associate Dean’s response (or, if applicable, the date of the Dean’s response to any appeal).
  6. 6. This complaint process applies only to significant problems that directly implicate Campbell Law School’s program of legal education and its compliance with the ABA Standards. It is not intended to be an alternative or additional process to address matters governed by other law school or university rules, policies, or procedures.

 XVIII. Withdrawing from a Course

A student who wishes to withdraw from a law school course after the semester begins should contact the law school’s Registrar during normal business hours (weekdays, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.), and request, complete, and timely return to her a DROP/ADD form, which is available on the law school’s intranet or in the Registrar’s suite.

As a general rule (but subject to University policies and federal law), dropping a course has no adverse financial impact (nor triggers any tuition refund) if the student remains registered for credits sufficient to remain a “full time” student.

A student is encouraged to consult with the law school’s Registrar, or its Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, to discuss any possible adverse academic impact (including, without limitation, transcript notation) triggered by dropping a course.

XIX. Withdrawing from Law School

A student who wishes to withdraw from the law school (whether temporarily or permanently) should contact the law school’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, during normal business hours (weekdays, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.), and schedule an appointment. The student also should review and complete a Withdrawal form, available on the law school’s intranet site or in the Registrar’s suite.

Withdrawing from law school may have an adverse financial impact (including, without limitation, accelerating student loan repayments). A student who wishes to withdraw from the law school is strongly encouraged to review the University’s tuition refund policy (available here: http://www.campbell.edu/student-services/business-office/student-services-business-office-tuition-payments/tuition-refunds/) and schedule an appointment, during normal business hours (weekdays, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.) with the law school’s Assistant Director of Financial Aid.

A student is also encouraged to consult with the law school’s Registrar, or its Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, to discuss any possible adverse academic impact (including, without limitation, transcript notation) triggered by withdrawing from law school.

Any student seeking to withdraw from the law school who believes that medical, military, or other circumstances warrant an exception from the University’s tuition refund policy must appeal to:

Mr. James O. Roberts, Vice President of Business and Treasurer

Campbell University

Room 111, J.A. Campbell Administration Building

Buies Creek, NC 27506

910-893-1240

roberts@campbell.edu

[1] Revised for clarity in July 2019

[2] This RWE requirement is in addition to the required first- and second-year legal writing courses.

[3] The contours of “substantial length” are left to the discretion of each professor, but the term is presumptively met if the work product(s) meet or exceed (i) 20 double-spaced pages or (ii) 5,000 words.

[4] The Rigorous Writing Experience Form can be found at the law school’s intranet, and a copy can be obtained in the Registrar’s suite.

[5] An “elective course” is any course other than (i) a first-year course, (ii) Advanced Legal Writing, Business Organizations, Constitutional Law II, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Sales and Leases, Secured Transactions, Trial Advocacy, and Wills and Trusts, and (iii) an extracurricular activity, such as any moot court or mock trial event.

[6] Independent study credits earned for one rigorous writing experience will be reflected on the student’s law school transcript with a numerical grade.

[7] https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/standards.html.